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Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Tut, Tut! Mr. Tutt: Review


Mr. Ephraim Tutt is a kindly old lawyer who uses his position to do good. He has a twinkle in his eye and a penchant for taking on the underdog as his clients. He wears a stovepipe hat and an old frock coat, but Arthur Train would have the reader believe it to be a suit of armor in disguise. This is a highly romanticized, early 20th Century collection, that is none-the-less quite entertaining. The book contains eight stories about Mr. Tutt that originally appeared in The Saturday Evening Post. The stories were so popular that Ephraim Tutt became known as the "best known lawyer in America." In this volume Mr. Tutt is up to his ancient neck in all sorts of devious legal battles in an effort to bring justice to the innocent and deserving. But we know that with Tutt on the trail, crime and skullduggery simply have no chance at all. Three and a half stars.

The stories included here are:

"The Bloodhound": In which Mr. Tutt lays a trap for his rival, the dishonest prosecutor "Bloodhound" O'Brien who thinks he has successfully framed an innocent man.
 

"Tut, Tut! Mr. Tutt": In which Mr. Tutt gets the better of a "new money" society matron who thinks she can railroad anyone she sees as her inferior.

"The Liberty of the Jail": In which Mr. Tutt uses his knowledge of human nature to earn his client a rightful settlement
 

"Hocus-Pocus": A little slight of hand allows Mr. Tutt to help a deserving young woman get her inheritance.
 

"Saving His Face": Mr. Tutt teaches a self-important man a little humility with the help of a determined notary and a little-known bit of law.
 

"In Witness Whereof": It pays to be sure who a lawyer's client really is....and you better be sure that you are Mr. Tutt's client if that wily lawyer is involved in your case.

"The Twelve Little Husbands": Despite what looks like an open & shut case against his client, Mr. Tutt proves that sometimes a poisoner isn't a poisoner.


"The Cloak of St. Martin": Will Mr. Tutt's "cloak" keep his clerk out of trouble?



This fulfills the book with a Lawyer, Courtroom, etc. Golden Vintage Bingo Square.


4 comments:

fredamans said...

I like books with short stories. Especially during a reading slump. Great review!

bloodymurder said...

This sounds like great fun, thanks Bev - never actually come across it before.

Ryan said...

The title is hilarious

Bev Hankins said...

Ryan, Mr. Tutt is kind of funny himself. Not laugh out loud funny, but a nice gentle chuckle. :-)